Register for our new FREE MISRA C/C++ and BARR-C webinars

Mon, 03/09/2020 - 13:49
MISRA C/C++ and BARR-C webinars with Roberto Bagnara BUGSENG

 

Update:

We added 3 new bonus webinars: April 23 (ECLAIR, IDEs and extensible editors) and May 5, 7 (floating-point computation traps & pitfalls, parts 1 and 2).  Check them out below!

 

BUGSENG have been running MISRA C/C++ workshops, seminars and presentations across Europe and India in recent years. As a result, we’ve had several requests for some of this learning and expertise to be translated to a webinar format. We’re delighted to announce we’ve done just that and will be running the first five webinars from March to June.

Missed Embedded World? No problem!

We’re kicking off the series on Tuesday 17 March, with the talk our CTO Roberto Bagnara prepared for the Embedded World conference in Nuremberg in February. Many of you will know that we were forced to pull out of this event due to the coronavirus situation. We would like to take this opportunity to apologize for any inconvenience, but also to offer you the opportunity to listen to the talk via webinar.

In our webinars, we cover the latest developments in MISRA C/C++ and BARR-C coding standards, static analysis tools, tool qualification, and compliance to industrial functional safety standards. Each webinar will last around 45-50 minutes plus 10-15 minutes for questions, and all are completely free.

Roberto Bagnara, PhD will host all the webinars. As well as being BUGSENG’s CTO, Roberto is a Computer Science Professor at the University of Parma and a member of the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG14 - C Standardization Working Group and the MISRA C Working Group. The whole BUGSENG team is particularly proud that Roberto received (for the third time) the ‘Best Presentation Award’ for his talk at Automotive SPIN Workshop earlier this year.

Here’s the full webinar schedule: Topics, dates and times


Webinar 1: BARR-C:2018 and MISRA C:2012: Synergy Between the Two Most Widely Used C Coding Standards

This is your opportunity to listen to Roberto’s Embedded World talk, which is based on a new paper by Roberto, Michael Barr of BARR Group, and BUGSENG’s Patricia Hill. In this webinar, Roberto explains why the choice between MISRA C:2012 and BARR-C:2018 is not such a hard decision after all. He will introduce BARR-C:2018, describe its relationship with MISRA C:2012, and discuss the parallel and serial adoption of the two coding standards. He will also explain why the two coding standards are complementary in two quite different ways.

Date: Tuesday 17 March 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CET (UTC +1)

REGISTER HERE


 

Webinar 2: A Guided Tour of the New Features in ECLAIR 3.7

ECLAIR 3.7 comes with some exciting new features. These include extensive support for BARR-C:2018, the possibility of working with software metrics from the GUI and new facilities for filtering and prioritizing reports. In this webinar, Roberto will demonstrate these and other features of ECLAIR 3.7, live, on a real software project.

Date: Wednesday 25 March 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CET (UTC +1)

REGISTER HERE


 

Webinar 3: MISRA C and its Key Role for the Compliance to Industrial Safety Standards

Embedded software is playing a steadily increasing role in all industrial sectors. And, in some sectors, software is responsible for functionality that impacts the overall system safety and security. As a result, more companies and projects are required to comply to industry safety standards (such as CENELEC EN 50128, IEC 61508, IEC 62304, ISO 26262, RTCA DO-178C)

In this webinar, the focus is on one of the key aspects of such standards: the possibility to program in subsets of standardized languages such as C or C++. Roberto will start with an introduction to the traps and pitfalls of the C programming language and move on to discuss MISRA C, the most authoritative subset of C for the development of high-integrity systems.

Date: Thursday 16 April 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

Bonus Webinar: Technology Preview: Using ECLAIR with IDEs and Extensible Editors

After years of struggling about the proper way of interfacing ECLAIR with IDEs, we are confident we have come up with the right technology. The result is so good that we believe this adds up to the set of features that are unique to ECLAIR. In this webinar, we will showcase the use of ECLAIR with Eclipse-based IDEs (a solution that is extensible to many other IDEs) and the use of ECLAIR with Emacs (a solution that will be ported to other extensible editors as well).

Date: Thursday 23 April 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

Webinar 4: The Qualification of Software Tools in Compliance with ISO 26262

Modern software development processes are strongly based on the use of tools, whether or not the developed software has safety or security requirements. ISO 26262, like several other functional safety standards, requires tool users to provide proper justification for the use of a tool in the development of safety-related systems. Such justification must be based on the confidence that the tool works according to its specification for the project-specific use cases and operational environments.

In this webinar, we will introduce the tool qualification process as defined by ISO 26262. This includes planning tool usage, evaluation of the required confidence level, and the identification and execution of qualification methods, documentation and review activities. Roberto will focus on the qualification of compilers and verification tools by validation and, in the case of verification tools, he will illustrate the most important (and, often, misunderstood) requirements qualification imposes on the development of the tools and of the associated qualification kits.

Date: Tuesday 28 April 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

Bonus Webinar: Floating-Point Computation Traps & Pitfalls: Part 1

The use of floating-point computations for the implementation of critical systems is perceived as increasingly acceptable. Even in modern avionics, one of the most critical domains for software, floating-point numbers are now used, more often than not, instead of fixed-point arithmetic. However, designing and testing floating-point algorithms is significantly more difficult than designing and testing integer algorithms. Acceptance of floating-point computations in the design of critical systems was facilitated by the widespread adoption of significant portions of the IEEE 754 standard for binary floating-point arithmetic: nonetheless, many highly-complex traps and pitfalls remain. In this first webinar on the subject, we will present examples showing how things can go spectacularly wrong with floating-point numbers. We will then introduce the IEEE 754 binary floating-point formats, including NaNs, signed zeroes, infinities and subnormals, along with the reasons they are there. We will illustrate the IEEE 754 rounding modes, with an emphasis on round-to-nearest tails-to-even, and the properties that floating-expressions do and do not possess. After a review of the phenomena that are most often undesirable (NaN generation, overflows, underflows, absorption, cancellation, ...), we will conclude the webinar with a teaser for the second webinar in the series, where we will illustrate how some of the illustrated problems can be solved or mitigated.

Date: Tuesday 5 May 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

Bonus Webinar: Floating-Point Computation Traps & Pitfalls: Part 2

The use of floating-point computations for the implementation of critical systems is perceived as increasingly acceptable. Even in modern avionics, one of the most critical domains for software, floating-point numbers are now used, more often than not, instead of fixed-point arithmetic. However, designing and testing floating-point algorithms is significantly more difficult than designing and testing integer algorithms. In this second webinar on the subject, we will present algorithms where things may go wrong because the peculiarities of floating-point numbers were not taken into account in the design. For each such algorithm, we will illustrate how to improve the situation. The "Floating-Point Computation Traps & Pitfalls: Part 1" webinar is a prerequisite for this follow-up webinar.

Date: Thursday 7 May 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

Webinar 5: MISRA C++: A Subset of C++ for the Development of High-Integrity Systems

C++ is increasingly used for the development of safety and mission-critical systems. This is partly pushed by market demand concerning new machine learning methodologies and applications, such as advanced driver assistance systems. While C++ improves upon C by providing linguistic support for features that allow programmers to write safer code, it also presents numerous traps and pitfalls that can easily result in defective, unreadable, unmaintainable and difficult to test software.

This webinar has been prepared by Roberto and Chris Tapp, Chair of the MISRA C++ Working Group. We will start by explaining the non-definite behaviors of C++ and their origin. We will then introduce MISRA C++, its history and evolution and discuss how it is part of a software development process that addresses the requirements of functional safety standards. Finally we will cover the planned evolution of MISRA C++, including its ongoing merge with AUTOSAR C++:14.

Date: Thursday 14 May 2020

Time: 11:00 - 12:00 CEST (UTC+2)

REGISTER HERE


 

We hope you’ll be able to join us for some, or all, of this first series of BUGSENG webinars. They are free, but places are limited so please register as soon as possible using the links above. We’re looking forward to delving deeper into these important topics with you, answering your questions and getting feedback.

Roberto Bagnara, PhD is CTO of BUGSENG, a leading provider of solutions and services for static code analysis. He is also a member of the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG14 - C Standardization Working Group and the MISRA C Working Group.

 

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